Cranberry Pumpkin Woof-uts Recipe (donuts)

Cranberry Pumpkin Donuts        What pup doesn’t love to eat pumpkin and throw in some cranberries for a healthy option – for a wonderful experience.  Cranberries contain a high level of resveratrol, which is a natural compound found to have anti-cancer properties. These properties also reduce the risk of heart disease.

Pumpkin helps to balance the pancreas, which produces insulin so it is especially important in the diets of dogs with diabetes or hypoglycemia.

Dry Ingredients      Start by mixing the soy, fava bean and hazelnut flours together.   Then mix in the baking soda and baking powder.  Set aside.

 Other Ingredients 2    Gather the wet ingredients and beat together.

Cranberry Pumpkin Mixture     Add the wet mix to the dry mix on low speed of a stand mixer.  Beat on medium for about a minute.

Cranberry Pumpkin Donuts - before baking    Lightly oil a miniature donut pan and bake for 15 minutes. Let cool for 5 minutes and turn over to remove the donuts. Let them cool completely before giving to your little pup/s.

Keep in an airtight container within the refrigerator for a week or freeze for up to 3 months. Defrost completely before giving to your pup/s.  Makes about 25 to 30 miniature woof-uts (donuts).

OPTIONAL:  You can also make these into cakes and bones sticks. You can use any shape that you have, including miniature cupcakes.

Cranberry Pumpkin Bones     Bone Sticks – Make this recipe as written and place in the bone pan shapes.

Cranberry Pumpkin Bone Cakes     Bone Cakes – Make this recipe but add 1 cup of warm water to the recipe. This will make the cakes lighter.

Special Note:  Remember that gluten-free flours do not react as wheat flours (gluten) do when mixing and baking. I have added fava bean flour, baking soda and baking powder so that these will expand some.

Ingredients:

1 cup soy flour

½ cup hazelnut flour

½ cup fava bean flour

1-½ tsp. cinnamon

1 tsp. baking powder

1 tsp. baking soda

¼ cup finely chopped organic dried cranberries (no sugar added is the best)

2 eggs – beaten

½ cup olive oil

1 cup pure organic pumpkin (canned or fresh from the garden)

1 cup warm filtered water (optional: for cakes)

 

Rice, Rice Flour and Diabetic Dogs

As I read blogs with diabetic dog treat recipes and even some of the homemade dog food recipes, I am surprised at how many believe rice and rice flour are good substitutions for wheat flour.  When you have a diabetic dog, your main concern is to maintain their blood glucose level.  Ever time they eat, whether a treat or a meal, their blood glucose is affected.  Exercise also affects it but we will focus on the food part of life this post.  With that said, we much be cautious with ingredients.  We should be focusing on low-glycemic index ingredients.  These are the green peas, green beans, spinach, oats, oat flour, Quinoa, Quinoa flour, Gava beans, Gava bean flour, green pea flour, buckwheat flour and spinach flour. This is not a complete list but a start.

Rice have a high glycemic index value such as 85 for white rice and 75 for brown rice. The high glycemic index values of either white or brown rice flour, can make their blood glucose (sugar) levels rise after eating.

Bottom line:  Stay away from treats made with wheat flour (which includes Semolina, Rye and Barley) , all-purpose flour, white rice flour or brown rice flour.  Rice is a starchy food and is NOT good for a diabetic dog.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/541050-rice-flour-blood-sugar/#ixzz2fmoFybUh

Homemade Marrow Pops

For the basic homemade marrow pops, pour the GF organic homemade marrow broth into an ice cube tray of any shape. Freeze until solid and store/serve.

We always encourage fuzzy child parents to start with highly nutritional homemade marrow broth.  Most grocery stores (such as Whole Foods), Co-ops or even local farmers, have frozen beef bones for a very reasonable price.  I get a bag of about 6 bones for $4.00 but these bones come from organic grass-fed beef.

Place about 3 marrow bones in a large pot filled ½ full of filtered water.  Bring to a medium boil for about 20 minutes.  Remove the bones and throw away because the new veterinarian standards are that meat bones are too hard for the back teeth and may cause hairline fractures.

These are only a few examples of healthy items you can put in the middle of the marrow pops:

  • Chicken, beef or salmon – A piece of cooked chicken or turkey or salmon can be added to each pop. What a yummy surprise in the middle!
  • Homemade Dog Treats – You can stick in small pieces of homemade dog treats. Don’t worry if some of the treat is not totally submerged in each marrow pop.  It will inspire your fuzzy child to get to the treat faster!
  • Vegetables – Adding vegetables like sweet potatoes, spinach, broccoli, green beans and/or green peas will give additional nutrition.  You can even add several to each cup before starting the freezing process.

Homemade marrow pops will last about a month in the freezer, but they don’t usually stay around that long.  When frozen, pop out into a plastic freezer bag for storage and start on your next batch.

More Ideas:

  1. Colored Ice Trays – I strongly suggest you use a different colored ice trays when making marrow pops for your fuzzy child/children. This way, other family members understand that these are for the four-legged family members. These marrow pops are safe for humans to eat and handle.
  1. Location – These marrow pops are best enjoyed outdoors as a water hose makes clean up a snap.
  2. Rubber Cupcake Liners – Place the rubber cupcake liners on a cookie sheet and fill with the homemade marrow broth about halfway.  When frozen, pop out of the rubber liners into a plastic freezer bag for storage.

**Make sure that the marrow pop shape is the right size for your dog’s breed and size.  We don’t want anyone choking during this fun outdoor activity. If you are not sure of the size you should be using, please consult with your veterinarian. 

Diabetic Dog Nutrition – Part 1 Released

Tracey Patterson  has posted on You Tube again and has some very good points about nutrition for dogs in general, as she speaks from experience with a diabetic dog.  This is part one of her Diabetic Dog Boot Camp series, that was released this week. Sign up for her RSS feed and receive Part 2 when released.

It took me many months reading books and talking with several vets, to understand how to make homemade meals for my own dogs. Now…it is the only way to go and they dance for their meals. No more emergency vet bills, no more sick dogs and only healthy skin, fur and guts.  Through the appalling and numerous dog food recalls, along with treat recalls…we decided many years ago to start making our dogs fresh, organic and nutritious food. I soon learned that Daisy’s blood sugar became stable and she needed less insulin on a daily basis. Isn’t this our ultimate goal?

I will be posting several recipes soon and talking about adding ‘bone powder’ to our dog’s food.

Basic Dog Kibble Recipe and How to Make it Organic and Healthy

Due to the continued use of ingredients from China by U.S. dog food companies and continued recalls of contaminated dog food and treats, I have decided to bake kibble for our dogs each week. Below is a recipe I found but have made changes to make it organic and healthy. I have changed the instructions but have left the ingredients crossed out so that you can see how I changed the recipe to make it healthier. Keep in mind when reading dog food or treat recipes:

– Dogs cannot digest milk products (it is the lactose in the milk)

– Some dogs are allergic to whole wheat flour or rye flour because of the gluten

– Bone meal is necessary to build strong dog bones

– Salt is not needed to be added in most recipes

– Worcestershire sauce has many spices including onion and garlic, that is not needed in a dog’s diet

–  Homemade vegetable broth is far more healthier than store bought (salt added) broth

– Fresh fruit and vegetables are healthier than dried

– Always substitute pork products with healthier lean meat, such as turkey or chicken

This is a basic kibble recipe that you can change for varying taste.  Seal enough fresh healthy dog kibble in a Seal-a-Meal food storage bag (or similar type of bag)  for each day. The kibble will keep in an airtight container for several weeks in the refrigerator or several months in the freezer.  Every morning take out one bag of frozen kibble and place in the refrigerator so you will have fresh kibble for the next day.  (1 c. per dog x 2 meals = 4 c. fresh kibble for 2 dogs)

4 cups whole wheat flour or oat flour
2 cups rye flour or brown rice flour

1/2 cup pumpkin powder
2 cups nonfat milk powder
2 teaspoons bone meal
1 cup flaxseed

1/2 cup oat bran
2 1/2 3 tablespoons dried parsley spinach flakes or 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
1 teaspoon kosher salt
4 eggs
1 cup corn oil  1/2 cup Blended oil
4 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
3 cups water or 1 cup homemade broth
4 cups  1-1/2 lbs. cooked ground beef, pork, lamb, duck, chicken or turkey
2 large cooked and puréed sweet potatoes or 1 – 15 oz. canned organic pure pumpkin
1-1/2 cups chopped dried apples or  4 medium chopped fresh apples
2 cups frozen chopped spinach – thawed and drained or 1 large pkg. of frozen spinach

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray two large cookie sheets with nonstick cooking spray.

2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flours, pumpkin powder, bone meal, wheat germ, oat bran, and parsley.

3. In a smaller bowl, beat the eggs and blend them with the oil, broth, pumpkin, spinach, apples and meat.

4. Fold in the wet ingredient mixture and combine it until evenly distributed. It takes elbow grease to mix this but you can use a Kitchen-aid mixer.

5. Spread the dough onto the two cookie sheets while making it very flat. Use a knife to score into long lengths but do not score width wise.

8. Bake for 45 minutes or until the kibble is golden brown.

9. When you remove the kibble from the oven, it will be  moist. Let it sit on cooling racks for about 30 minutes. Then separate the rows of kibble and cut into bite-sized squares. I have basset hounds and decided to cut the kibble into 1/2″ squares. After separating the kibble, place back into the oven for another 30 minutes and then turn off the oven but leave the kibble in the oven.

Variations:  Other healthy ingredients you can add for flavor and beneficial nutrients:  barley, fresh basil leaf, beets, carrots, green beans, green peas, nutritional yeast flakes, potatoes, rolled oats, rosemary and zucchini.

Cheese & Meat Muffins (great for diabetic or healthy dogs)

Our dogs have always enjoyed this batch of hamburger and cheese poppers (or some call them muffins). It will make about 24 small poppers.
1 cup of cooked meat (it could be ground hamburger or turkey or chicken)
3/4 cup of water
1/2 cup old fashioned or quick cooking oats
1/2 cup oat flour
1 medium grated carrot (about 1/2 cup)
1 large egg
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 cup of shredded low-fat cheese
2 tsp. fresh oregano from your garden (or 1 tsp. dried oregano)
—————
Mix all ingredients together and spoon batter into oil sprayed (or paper lined) mini muffin tins. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes. Let cool for 30 minutes before serving. These keep in the freezer for around 3 months.